Retirement

A place to hang out, get to know other Muggles and discuss everything under the sun.
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ChrisKochmanski
Posts: 1034
Joined: Tue Apr 09, 2019 9:51 pm
Location: Saline, Michigan

#81

Post by ChrisKochmanski »

I feared that I'd be bored in retirement. And I'm NOT. Far from it, in fact. The days fly by.

Though note that I do work part-time, doing copywriting gigs for a couple of marketing and creative services firms. This amounts to, on average, maybe 25 hours per month. It's fun enough, and it gives me a reason to check my email every day. I'd like to keep doing this for two or three more years, maybe even five, while my wife is still wrapped up in her own part-time seasonal work and volunteer activities. Then I think we'll cut it all off and do the fully retired things, like more travel and visiting the kids and grandkids more than they'll want us to.
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SReh26
Posts: 641
Joined: Thu Apr 01, 2021 10:48 pm

#82

Post by SReh26 »

According to Reddit, VTI and VTSAX Vanguard Admiral Fund are surefire investments. Can I get a reality check from wiser minds? Is this another millennial delusion?

Of the 4 million funds out there, why are these two so great besides being broad based low cost index funds?
Last edited by SReh26 on Fri Sep 17, 2021 6:38 pm, edited 1 time in total.
hoover
Posts: 259
Joined: Mon Mar 29, 2021 7:26 pm

#83

Post by hoover »

I have VTSAX as a significant portion of my portfolio. The expense ratio is a paltry 0.04% and the value has more than doubled over the past 5 years. It's up over 20% YTD. What's not to like?
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SReh26
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Joined: Thu Apr 01, 2021 10:48 pm

#84

Post by SReh26 »

hoover wrote: Fri Sep 17, 2021 3:16 pm I have VTSAX as a significant portion of my portfolio. The expense ratio is a paltry 0.04% and the value has more than doubled over the past 5 years. It's up over 20% YTD. What's not to like?
That’s great. Does it pay dividends?
hoover
Posts: 259
Joined: Mon Mar 29, 2021 7:26 pm

#85

Post by hoover »

SReh26 wrote: Fri Sep 17, 2021 11:44 pm
hoover wrote: Fri Sep 17, 2021 3:16 pm I have VTSAX as a significant portion of my portfolio. The expense ratio is a paltry 0.04% and the value has more than doubled over the past 5 years. It's up over 20% YTD. What's not to like?
That’s great. Does it pay dividends?
Yes.
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SReh26
Posts: 641
Joined: Thu Apr 01, 2021 10:48 pm

#86

Post by SReh26 »

ChrisKochmanski wrote: Mon Sep 13, 2021 9:08 pm I feared that I'd be bored in retirement. And I'm NOT. Far from it, in fact. The days fly by.

Though note that I do work part-time, doing copywriting gigs for a couple of marketing and creative services firms. This amounts to, on average, maybe 25 hours per month. It's fun enough, and it gives me a reason to check my email every day. I'd like to keep doing this for two or three more years, maybe even five, while my wife is still wrapped up in her own part-time seasonal work and volunteer activities. Then I think we'll cut it all off and do the fully retired things, like more travel and visiting the kids and grandkids more than they'll want us to.
That sounds ideal. Glad it’s working out well for you!
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mntlblok
Posts: 252
Joined: Tue Jun 15, 2021 6:13 am
Location: Pompano Beach, FL
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#87

Post by mntlblok »

SReh26 wrote: Sun May 02, 2021 7:40 pm Wsj has been screaming lately that equities are in a bubble, never more so than today. Thoughts?

A friend of mine went all to cash but with the s and p up a crazy percentage in the past 12 months, it seems silly to leave the party now. Ive played defense since 2016 so I’m already in a conservative allocation, whatever that even means today, what with so many asset classes seemingly inflated.
Just found this thread and have only read to this point, so possibly shoulda waited to chime in until I'd read it all, but feared I'd never get back to this spot or be unable to find it, again. First, I'm *very* happy to have found this Muggles bunch. I'm generally *much* too picky about friends, but I really like a bunch of you folks.

OK, back to what I wanted to add. I've been reading John Mauldin's free newsletter every Saturday morning for a couple of decades, so have therefor figured out that all one must do is accurately predict the future. *Have* actually, on "big picture" stuff, been able to do that a few times - and *still* managed to mostly muck it up - either with imprecise timing or because of a "less total understanding" of a situation than I'd thought I'd had.

Coming up on three years of being retired. Wifey, thanks to age discrimination, has ended up working from home as a programmer about 20 hours a week and now seems pretty happy with that. Looks like she'll try total retirement next spring, but realizes that she'll need something "work-like" to do. I think she'll successfully pull that off. She's nearly as weird as I.

I, on the other hand, was one of the happiest "total" retirees ever. Been working since I was 15 and would have preferred "playing" to working most *all* of that time. I tend to over-do my hobbies, so that was pretty ideal for retirement. Reminds me, though, that the differentiation between "work" and "play" can be much more blurred than maybe what is generally accepted. Is going down Google rabbit holes "work"?

Back to that "accurately predicting the future" thing. Health, rather than financial issues, appear to possibly be looming for both of us, even though we're only 68. Just reading an article about the increase in autoimmune diseases amongst our cohort. Me no likey. Already been knocked out of my "old man tennis tournament" touring plans, as that "removal of three wrist bones" surgery didn't work out very well - after having had *wonderful* results with knee replacements. Covid came along at about that same time as the failed surgery. Still trying to "make do" with the scuba hobby, but fear the writing is on the wall for that, too.

Anyway, if you can't accurately predict the future, feel free to wallow with me in my nihilism and absurdist philosophy. :-)
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SReh26
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Joined: Thu Apr 01, 2021 10:48 pm

#88

Post by SReh26 »

I’m in the process of opening my first IRA ever and backdoor converting to a Roth IRA. Needless to say, this is way too late. I hope others get an earlier start. However, better late than never I suppose. :(
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SReh26
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Joined: Thu Apr 01, 2021 10:48 pm

#89

Post by SReh26 »

I’m informed that index investing is The Way of all ways. Is it just a marketing gimmick or is it fundamentally sound?

I do get that it is less expensive than active management, but I’m concerned that this approach is being touted as a panacea and a sure bet at any price, which sounds a lot like snake oil to this round the way girl.
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joequavis
Posts: 396
Joined: Fri Apr 12, 2019 12:29 pm
Location: Windsor, Colorado

#90

Post by joequavis »

I don't always invest in mutual funds, but when I do, I prefer index funds.

All voiceovers aside, I invest in a few individual stocks, and for the past 12 years or so, have been in various market index funds. I'm nigh on my 45th birthday and spent the first decade or so of my investing career fretting over individual stocks / mutual funds, etc. Shifting out of equities into bonds and vice versa at the worst possible times. Finally in ~2009, I decided to stop fretting, pick several market index funds and enjoy the ride. Could I have obtained a better return by re-evaluating on a semi-monthly basis? Maybe, probably. But my cortisol level thanks me for not. I do not intend to change this approach for the foreseeable future.
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SReh26
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Joined: Thu Apr 01, 2021 10:48 pm

#91

Post by SReh26 »

I opened a backdoor Roth in Fidelity. Probably of limited usefulness since they are likely not permitted going forward. So I‘ll have a $7k account earning $4 a year tax free to remind me of my folly.
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